Dog First Aid - Emergencies (Injury)
We got a PAWsome pocket handbook on Pet First Aid by The National Humane Society and we just had to share it with you!
We know how important your pet's health and safety is and we want to make sure you have the information at your finger tips!
We will have the information in individual blogs so it's easy for you to find based on what you need to know!
This blog post is on the symptoms and treatments on injuries!
Injuries can range from sprains and strains, to more serious injuries such as a leg fracture or dislocation of the joint. Start by calming down your dog to try and diagnose the injury.
Sprains & Strains - An injury to the muscle
Symptoms:
  • Limping
  • Swelling
  • Pain

Treatment:

  • With your dog lying down, cover the injured limb with a towel and apply an ice pack on top.
  • Do this 3-4 times daily, for 5-15 minutes at a time. After the first 24-hours, switch from icing the injury to warm compresses.
  • Do not resume exercise or activity until the injury heals.
  • If there is no improvement or the injury worsens over 24 hours, seek immediate veterinary help.
  • Always notify your vet when somethings happens to your dog, even if they do not need to go to the vet.

Bone Fractures - A break in the bone

Symptoms:

  • Pain
  • Disfigurement and/or bone sticking through the skin
  • Lameness
  • Swelling

Treatment:

  • For all fractures, watch for shock and administer CPR as needed.
  • Keep your pet calm.
  • Loosely cover the wound with sterile gauze or pad and loosely tape.
  • Avoid splinting unless properly trained.
  • Seek immediate veterinary help.

 

Joint Dislocation - The two most common joints to be dislocated (bone out of joint) are your dog's elbows and hips

Symptoms:

  • Pain when affected area is touched
  • Foot does not reach the ground
  • If hip is affected: the dislocated hind leg may be shorter or longer than the other
  • If elbow is affected: the dislocated elbow may be bent and lower leg may be pointed toward or away from the body

Treatment:

  • Check your dog for signs of shock, and administer CPR if needed.
  • Avoid splinting unless properly trained.
  • Seek your veterinarian as soon as possible.

 

December 02, 2021 — Amanda Gyetvay