All our pets are unique so knowing what is normal is essential. This will help you know when things are abnormal. This blog will help you learn what is normal.

We got a PAWsome pocket handbook on Pet First Aid by The National Humane Society and we just had to share it with you! We know how important your pet's health and safety is and we want to make sure you have the information at your finger tips!

We will have the information in individual blogs so it's easy for you to find based on what you need to know!

All our pets are unique so knowing what is normal is essential. This will help you know when things are abnormal. Here's how to find out what is normal:

  • Resting Pulse
    • Inner Thigh
      • Inner thigh is the easiest location to feel for a pulse
      • Lay your pet down on either side
      • Gently lift the top back leg away from the lower back leg
      • Using a light touch, place your index and middle fingers where leg meets the torso (you may use either leg)
      • Feel for a pulse and count for 60 seconds
    • Front Legs- just below the wrist
      • With your pet either sitting or laying down
      • Locate the area just above the middle pad on the underside of either front paw
      • Place your index and middle fingers in that area and feel for a pulse
      • Count for 60 seconds
    • Hind legs- just below the ankle
      • Have your pet either sit or lie down
      • Locate the area just above the middle pad on the underside of either hind paw
      • Place your index and middle fingers in that area and feel for a pulse
      • Count for 60 seconds
  • Heart Rate (Beats Per Minute)
    • Small ( < 30lbs ) = 100-160 BPM
    • Medium-Large (30-90lbs) = 60-100 BPM
    • X-Large ( > 90lbs ) = 60-80 BPM
    • Keep in mind that younger animals have faster heartbeats than older ones
  • Breathing Rate
    • 10-30 Breaths Per Minute
    • Up to 200 Pants Per Minute
  • Normal Temperatures
    • 100.2 degrees F to 102.8 degrees F

 

October 13, 2021 — Amanda Gyetvay